What is the causes and symptoms of the oppositional defiant disorder

What is the causes and symptoms of the oppositional defiant disorder

A persistent pattern of extremely difficult and challenging behaviors, including tantrums, arguments and a general display of disruptive behavior, are symptoms that define oppositional defiant disorder (ODD).  

In most cases, these disobedient, challenging and often hostile behaviors are directed to parents, teachers or other adults who are in a position of authority. However, their inappropriate behaviors can also affect others around them. Unlike the difficult or challenging behavior that normally appears during childhood, the behavior associated with ODD is so severe that it ends up giving rise to significant alterations in the life of a teenager. Keep reading: How to get rid of dehydration nausea

This mental health condition is usually diagnosed in childhood or early adolescence, but it has the potential to persist into adulthood, especially if left untreated. However, if appropriate treatment is sought, those with ODD can learn the skills necessary to manage their symptoms, have more appropriate behaviors and experience a greater sense of well-being.

Causes and Risk Factors for Oppositional Defiant Disorder

What is the causes and symptoms of the oppositional defiant disorder

An exact cause of the oppositional defiant disorder has not yet been identified. Some causes that could contribute to its development can be a combination of hereditary and environmental factors. The possible causes and their explanations are listed below:

Genetic: Many children with the oppositional defiant disorder have family members with certain mental health conditions, such as mood disorders, depression or anxiety, which can contribute to the development of ODD. This suggests that vulnerability to the development of ODD can be inherited.

Physical: Another common hypothesis is that an imbalance of certain chemicals in the brain, such as serotonin, plays a role in the development of ODD. When they are not properly balanced, these substances can prevent people from being able to regulate their emotions, control impulses and behavior, which could lead to the appearance of ODD symptoms.

Environmental: It is believed that environments in which people spend much of their time have an impact on the susceptibility to develop ODD. Any change that increases stress and alters the sense of stability in a young person’s life can contribute to the risk of the development of disruptive behavior. Some examples may include multiple changes, the divorce of parents, change of school often or constant change of the people who take care of them.

Risk factors :

  • Be male
  • Natural disposition
  • Lack of supervision by caregivers
  • Inconsistent or rude discipline
  • Presence of delays in development
  • The family history of mental health problems or personality disorders
  • Being a victim of abuse or neglect
  • Growing up in a chaotic environment
  • Exposure to violence, especially in early childhood
  • Be exposed to highly stressful environments in a consistent manner
  • Personal or family history of substance abuse

Signs and Symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder

The oppositional defiant disorder

Although it can sometimes be difficult to distinguish the difference between a child with a strong character and one with a challenging opposition disorder, there are a number of symptoms that are observed when this disorder is present. The signs and symptoms of ODD tend to appear before a child turns 8, beginning little by little and then getting worse over time:

Behavioral symptoms:

  • Constant tantrums
  • Being with adults or authority figures
  • Chronic disobedience
  • Lack of adequate social skills
  • Refusing to comply with rules or requests
  • Deliberately disturb others
  • Blame others for their own mistakes or bad behavior
  • Being spiteful or vindictive
  • Acting aggressively towards colleagues
  • Frequent outbursts of rage
  • Say bad words or use obscene language
  • Saying consistently says hurtful or hateful things when altered
  • Move away or isolate yourself from others
  • Abuse of alcohol and other drugs
  • Having difficulty getting and keeping friends
  • Intentionally destroying relationships
  • Non-cooperative consistently

Physical symptoms :

  • Chronic headaches
  • Muscle tension
  • Accelerated heart rate
  • High blood pressure
  • Physical injuries resulting from violent or self-destructive behaviors

Cognitive symptoms :

  • Concentration problems
  • Deficient or absent skills for decision making
  • Lack of impulse control

Psychosocial symptoms :

  • Easy frustration
  • Poor mood tendency
  • Low self-esteem
  • Extreme agitation
  • Irritability
  • Feelings of hostility
  • Feelings of resentment
  • Persistently negative attitude
  • Dominant feelings of contrariety
  • Suicidal ideas

Effects of Defiant Opposition Disorder

The oppositional defiant disorder

When young people or adults with the oppositional defiant disorder are not given the opportunity to get the right treatment and the support they need, they often experience a series of negative effects in their lives. The following are examples of effects that could potentially occur when ODD symptoms are not treated:

  • Inability to meet work requirements
  • Frequent disciplinary actions
  • Social isolation
  • Conflicts within the family
  • Police intervention
  • Suspension or expulsion
  • School failure
  • Rejection of colleagues
  • Inability to develop and maintain healthy and meaningful interpersonal relationships
  • Low self-esteem
  • Participation in high risk and dangerous behaviors
  • Self-mutilation
  • Development of behavior disorders
  • Suicidal thoughts and behavior

Disorders at once

Disorders at once

The oppositional defiant disorder often occurs together with another behavioral disorder or mental health condition, which can lead to a series of additional challenges. This is the reason why the presence of any other mental health condition must be treated at the same time as the oppositional defiant disorder. You may also like: http://www.themadething.com/spa-treatments-beginners-guide/

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